Nashville’s conversation on ACT scores is misleading

With all the recent conversation about ACT scores, you would think the facts would be well established, but we keep reading ACT stories that report the same mistakes. Here are the facts.

Even though the average score in Tennessee and in Nashville remain well below what they should be — and what they will be — strong growth is happening. In Nashville, we saw big gains in the ACT this year, bigger gains than Tennessee saw as a whole. In fact, we were one of the top ten districts in the state for growth and earned 5’s—the top score—for value added. On top of that, Metro students averaged an ACT score almost a full point higher than projections.

That is huge news.

Why? These projections were made four years ago when these students were about to enter high school. That means our high school instruction has improved a great deal over the last four years.

  • Projected Mean Score: 17.49
  • Actual Mean Score: 18.43

But it’s still not good enough. We want every student to score a 21 or better on the ACT.

Let’s compare Tennessee’s average ACT score to that of Massachusetts:

  • MA – 24.1 (the highest in the nation)
  • TN – 19.7 (fourth from the bottom in the nation)

Looks pretty dim. But now let’s compare where those scores are coming from in those same two states:

  • MA – A quarter of students tested: Those headed to college who choose to take the ACT (and pay for it, study for it, etc).
  • TN – All students tested on the ACT: Everyone. Like Tennessee, the other states at the bottom of the rankings have universal testing of high schools students.

Are those playing fields level for comparison? No.

There are those who would argue that shouldn’t matter, that scores are too low in Nashville and Tennessee no matter how you look at it.

They are correct.

Every student in Tennessee takes the ACT. It’s not only used to measure our collective achievement, but it also gets them into a college mindset and assesses whether or not they are prepared for college.

That last part is where we have to do better. We have to better prepare our students for college. Anything less is a disservice to students in our schools.

Let’s go over that part again because it’s important.

No one in Metro Schools believes an 18.4 district average is acceptable. No one in Tennessee believes the 19.7 statewide average is acceptable. Anyone who thinks we are resting on the laurels of incremental score growth is wrong.

When you’re talking district-wide transformation, test scores are always the last piece to move – especially ACT scores. That’s because ACT scores measure the accumulated wealth of years of education.

The recurring obsession with ACT numbers does two things: it unfairly compares states with different populations taking the ACT and gives short shrift to the growth in student achievement and the hard work to make that happen.

The real solution is building stronger high school students who turn into stronger graduates. That starts as soon as they enter kindergarten.

Good thing, then, that we now have a district-level executive guiding instruction for K-12 as one, continuous whole. A unified vision for instruction at every grade level means elementary students will be better prepared for middle school. Middle schoolers will come to high school achieving at higher levels. And eleventh graders will score higher on the ACT.

Good thing, then, that we are moving our top experts in instruction into schools, where they can adapt and guide instruction for individual clusters, schools, classrooms and even students.

The transformation of Nashville’s public schools is ongoing and ever evolving. But it’s driven by – and has always been driven by – the same goal: across the board improvement in academic achievement for all students, by any measure.

Is the ACT important? Of course. Colleges use ACT scores for admissions decisions. Educators rely on them to assess how they are doing and how they can better prepare students for graduation.

But is it the end all, be all of the education conversation? No.

What should be the end all, be all of the education conversation? Everything leading up to the ACT.

High school graduate or dropout? It’s complicated.

When is a high school dropout really a graduate? It’s a strange but appropriate question when you look at the way graduate rates are calculated.

The education team at Nashville Public Television explores this question and breaks down what Nashville’s graduation rate really means in a new documentary airing this Thursday night at 9:00 p.m. The special is called “Graduation by the Numbers” and is part of the national “American Graduate: Let’s Make It Happen” series exploring high school dropout rates and efforts to boost graduation.

If you haven’t seen the previous “American Graduate” entry from NPT, called “Translating the Dream,” you’re really missing out. It looks at the challenges facing English learner and immigrant students as they try to graduate high school and navigate the options – or lack of options – given to them afterward.

If you want to join the conversation about graduates and dropouts, you can join NPT online this Tuesday night, January 22 at 7:30 p.m., for an online social screening of “Translating the Dream” using a new public media tool called OVEE. Producer LaTonya Turner and other panelists will join in on the discussion.

Translating the Dream: Online screening & panel discussion
Tuesday, January 22 at 7:30 p.m.
Click here to take part.

“Graduation by the Numbers”
Documentary airs Thursday, January 24 at 9:00 p.m.
on NPT channel 8

Here is more from the NPT press release:

Half-hour documentary looks at “Graduation by the Numbers;” part of national “American Graduate: Let’s Make It Happen” initiative.

NASHVILLE, Tennessee – January 10, 2013 — Nashville Public Television (NPT-Channel 8)  takes an in-depth look at efforts in Nashville to keep students in school until they graduate in “NPT Reports: Graduation by the Numbers,” premiering Thursday, January 24 at 9:00 p.m. The documentary is part of the national “American Graduate: Let’s Make it Happen” initiative.

In Nashville Public Schools in 2012, one in 11 students dropped out — 8.8 percent — which is almost four times the previous year’s dropout rate. But a student counted as a dropout is not necessarily someone who does not graduate. The result is that the graduation rate can go up—even as the rate of dropouts goes up. The NPT report, produced and narrated by LaTonya Turner, looks at why the numbers for graduates and those for dropouts often don’t add up.

“The numbers can be confusing and in some cases misrepresentative of who is graduating and who is not,” says Turner.

Nashville school officials have taken the lead in Tennessee by looking for ways to make student data more useful, accurate, and accessible, with the goal of spotting students in trouble before they show up in school reports or drop out altogether. The main risk factors for students dropping out are: attendance, academic performance, and behavior. Using a new online digital system for tracking individual student data called the Data Dashboard, Nashville educators can now pinpoint and trace the risk factors and intervene with the student early enough to prevent failure. They are finding that high school may be too late; the risk in many cases begins in middle school or even earlier.

Nashville’s new middle school bridge program was begun to specifically start honing in on earlier for students at risk of dropping out. Simultaneously, some Nashville high schools are now aggressively working to retain the students who might have slipped through but are starting to slip off the path to graduation..” to graduation. A good example is McGavock High School, the largest school in Nashville, which was among the first to embrace the Data Dashboard as a tool – from the office to students in the classroom. It’s part of McGavock’s aggressive effort to turn around a dismal performance record.

Following Nashville’s lead, Tennessee education officials are on the cusp of launching a statewide online data tracking system. The goal is to help educators more effectively identify and reach out to individual students with strategies and support that address their specific risk factors for dropping out before graduation.

“Graduation by the Numbers” is the second in a series of public affairs documentary by NPT as part of its role in the national Corporation for Public Broadcating (CPB) initiative “American Graduate: Let’s Make it Happen.” The first was “NPT Reports: Translating the Dream,”  an in-depth look at the graduation rate among ELL and immigrant students in Tennessee; the challenges they face that can prevent them from graduating on time; how schools and teachers are trying to address this increasingly demanding need; and how all of us are impacted when students drop out of school. It is available for free online viewing now at http://wnpt.org/amgrad.

About Nashville Public Television
Nashville Public Television is available free and over the air to nearly 2.4 million people throughout the Middle Tennessee and southern Kentucky viewing area, and is watched by more than 600,000 households every week. The mission of NPT is to provide, through the power of traditional television and interactive telecommunications, high quality educational, cultural and civic experiences that address issues and concerns of the people of the Nashville region, and which thereby help improve the lives of those we serve.

About American Graduate: Let’s Make it Happen
American Graduate: Let’s Make it Happen is helping local communities identify and implement solutions to the high school dropout crisis. American Graduate demonstrates public media’s commitment to education and its deep roots in every community it serves. Beyond providing programming that educates, informs and inspires, public radio and television stations — locally owned and operated — are an important resource in helping to address critical issues, such as the dropout rate. In addition to national programming, more than 75 public radio and television stations have launched on-the-ground efforts working with community and at risk youth to keep students on-track to high school graduation. More than 800 partnerships have been formed locally through American Graduate, and CPB is working with Alma and Colin Powell’s America’s Promise Alliance and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation .

About CPB
The Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), a private, nonprofit corporation created by Congress in 1967, is the steward of the federal government’s investment in public broadcasting. It helps support the operations of more than 1,300 locally-owned and -operated public television and radio stations nationwide, and is the largest single source of funding for research, technology, and program development for public radio, television and related online services.

Litton Middle School’s new renovations and new attitude serve its East Nashville neighborhood

Apply to Litton Middle School

UPDATE: The official dedication of the new Isaac Litton Middle school brought out Rep. Jim Cooper, Mayor Karl Dean, Councilman Anthony Davis, and more! See a slideshow of photos from the ribbon cutting below.


Original post:
When I arrived at the newly renovated Isaac Litton Middle School, principal Tracy Bruno was fleeing the spray of a lawn sprinkler deployed to help the parched and newly planted landscaping. The grass may not have been prepared for the drought, but the school is prepared for more students and a higher profile in its East Nashville neighborhood.

“We are the epitome of a neighborhood school, right here in the middle of all these houses,” Bruno told me. And it’s true. Litton sits nestled between small, residential streets like Winding Way and Littonwood Drive right off Gallatin Pike.

The renovations that have taken place over the last year and a half have transformed the school into a building that looks practically new – and that’s because a lot of it is. The main office has been expanded. The library has a massive bank of new windows opening to the front lawn. The cafeteria is brand new and full of natural light. And the gym – once completely disconnected from the main building – has now been built out with new entrances, a new concession stand, and a host of new classrooms underneath it for fifth grade and related arts classes.

The rest of the building has been so spruced up, refinished, and painted that there is no disconnect between old and new. It all feels new to 2012. Just in time, too, because Bruno and his faculty have made it their mission to make Litton the neighborhood middle school in East Nashville.

“You can’t just sit around in your office and wait for kids to come to your school. You have to go out there and market your school and sell it, tell people the great things that are going on at your school because nobody’s going to do it for you.”

One of those great things happening at Litton is a strong focus on STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) education. With new computers and projectors in every classroom, multiple iPad and netbook carts, and thousands of dollars in new STEM technology at the ready, Litton will prepare students to head right into Stratford STEM Magnet High School – another East Nashville neighborhood institution.

And Bruno’s mission to market his school isn’t self-serving. He sees in Litton the opportunity to bolster the sense of community that draws many people to East Nashville in the first place. He and his teachers have been working hard for the last year to make that happen, organizing events at feeder schools like Dan Mills Elementary and even going door-to-door to introduce themselves and build support for their school.

Fifth grade teacher Ashley Croft worked with the Martha O’Bryan Center on the Promise Neighborhood survey and used the opportunity to start building one-on-one relationships with the community.

“The whole idea was for parents and the community members to know that the teachers and the staff here care about the community,” Croft said. “And so showing up at their door for this survey – not even directly representing the school, but just for building community – I think it meant a lot to some parents.”

Bruno sees Litton’s zoned population, neighborhood placement, and STEM focus as advantages in an area filled with school options. Students in Litton’s neighborhood can choose among magnets, charters, and private schools. That’s a lot of competition in such a tight radius. But he sees plenty of reasons for parents to choose Litton.

“They live around the school. There’s familiarity. You have kids down the street that go to the same school your kids do. It’s just more of a community feel.” Indeed, listening to Bruno talk about what a neighborhood school can offer, he sounds a bit like a principal from a different era, working next to a doctor who makes house calls and a butter and egg delivery truck.

“I have no problem making a visit to a child’s house. I’ve had parents before who would call and say ‘Hey, my child missed the bus. I can’t get them there’ and I’ll go pick them up. It’s not a big thing, but the parents appreciate it. It could be a child who just doesn’t want to go to school. I will go to your house and talk to your child and tell them they need to go to school because sometimes parents need that help.”

And he expects a bit of reciprocity from parents; his open door policy means he is readily available to speak with parents, hear their concerns, and take their suggestions. “It helps the neighborhood take more ownership in the school and feel like they have a bigger part in the school and share as a stakeholder in the school.”

If Litton is the “epitome of a neighborhood school,” as Bruno boasts, then Bruno himself is the epitome of a great neighborhood principal, just like ones found all over Nashville in Metro’s other neighborhood schools. Principals from Joelton Elementary to Oliver Middle, Hermitage Elementary to Hillwood High build their schools the same way: to serve as resources and points of pride for their communities. Neighbors come to Overton football games donned head to toe in red and black. Long lines of early arriving parents gather outside Lakeview Elementary to chat and share stories from the school and the neighborhood.

That’s because our neighborhood schools are the neighborhoods they serve. Students live down the street, families play on the playgrounds, and school faculty and staff strive to better their communities through education.

Tracy Bruno can already see the change happening. “We have volunteers who were asking for things to do. That never happened three years previous. We had people at the doors asking, ‘What can I do to help Isaac Litton Middle School?’ That is a huge step in the right direction.”

With the new renovations, Litton has room to grow. And Bruno plans to fill it up.

“I want to see every classroom in this building filled with neighborhood kids. And I believe we can get there. There are enough students in East Nashville, in our cluster, in our zone, to fill this school up.”
His goal is to build a future for Litton where the young families now populating East Nashville feel great about sending their children there.

“I had a teacher in here last Monday who said ‘I will do whatever it takes to make my kids successful this year.’ When you have that kind of enthusiasm, the sky’s the limit.”

Letter to the State Board of Education: Uphold our Great Hearts denial

We respectfully, but strongly disagree with the recommendation of Dr. Nixon and believe that it oversteps legitimate authority to review charter decisions by local boards of education (TCA 49-13-108(a)(3)).

TCA 49-13-108(a)(3) states that the state board’s decision to remand must be based on “objective reasons.” The main reason given for remanding the decision (that MNPS did not follow our own policies/process) is factually incorrect. MNPS did follow all written policies regarding the role of the review committee and the Office of Innovation. Because Dr. Nixon’s decision was based on a false premise, this decision does not meet the “objective reasons” standard. Dr. Nixon’s recommendation relies on mischaracterization of the published review process. The process in its entirety is aligned with NACSA Principals and Standards and is followed by the Achievement School District.

Left unaddressed are the statements by Great Hearts that they cannot open a school in 2013 and that “in an email to supporters, Great Hearts Academy CEO Daniel Scoggin and President Peter Bezanson said they would like to open their first of five schools in 2014. Great Hearts will submit its appeal to the state this week, Scoggin and Bezanson said” (Tennessean, July 5, 2012). Since the application cycle for schools to open in 2014 is not held until April of 2013, action to remand for approval pre-judges and future application. TN Charter Law 49-13-107(b) states: “On or before October 1 of the year preceding the year in which the proposed charter school plans to begin operation, the sponsor seeking to establish the public charter school shall prepare and file with the chartering authority an application…”

This recommendation has been issued two years prior to “the year in which the proposed charter school plans to begin operation.” It remands a school proposal for approval that has not yet been through the proper application cycle for schools that will open in 2014. We welcome this application through our regular review process at our 2014 application deadline of April 1, 2013.

The recommendation validates three substantial and objective reasons for denial as important to the best interests of students, the district, and the community and affirms that the school should not be opened unless and until these reasons can be overcome.

  1. The recommendation requires the school to employee certified teachers. The application says it will be impossible to maintain the quality teacher pipeline they use in Phoenix if such a requirement is made.
  2. The recommendation limits the school to opening a single site. The application says they will be unable to execute their business plan without a guarantee of five schools.
  3. The recommendation requires a diversity plan using the “blind, lottery process” that MNPS uses in its choice schools. This is the process that the applicant claims to use in Phoenix, and the resulting segregation is unacceptable.
Demographics  of Great Hearts Schools in AZ

Demographics of Great Hearts Schools in AZ

The Great Hearts application went through the same review process, using the same standards as four other charter schools that were approved this year. Under the circumstances, it is difficult to find the district acted contrary to its best interests, those of the students, or the community it serves. Dr. Nixon’s recommendation replaces a thoughtful, transparent and rigorous review with a less thorough, less effective process. It also penalizes local, elected school boards for seeking to hear from all sides in making important decisions.

We respect Dr. Nixon and appreciate the gravity of the challenge he faces in trying to evaluate a three month process on the basis of a 1-hour hearing and a mountain of documents filed less than 24 hours before his recommendation was due. Deciding the case under such constraints, it is difficult to make a clear-eyed assessment of the facts.

If the recommendation disagreed with the reasons for denial instead of validating them, there might be a reason for the state board to intervene. Accepting this recommendation does substantial damage to the accountability relationship with the authorizer that lies at the very heart of the charter school bargain (autonomy for accountability).

Based on the recommendation affirming our objective reasons for denial, we sincerely hope that you will vote to maintain the balance of decision-making authority that this opinion threatens to upend.

Sincerely,

Jesse Register

The final budget is approved and in place. What’s in it?

Wednesday night, the Board of Education voted on a final 2012-13 Operating Budget for Metro Schools.

The Board previously approved a budget, which was submitted to the Metro Council. The Council voted to increase funding for Metro Schools, but provided $3.5 million less in operating funds than the Board of Education proposed.

After hours of consideration, deliberation, and a line-by-line review of the budget, an amended version was agreed upon. Whenever possible, reductions were kept away from classrooms and instruction.

Many people are asking what is in the budget and what didn’t make it. Here is a brief rundown.

WHAT’S IN THE BUDGET

Starting Teacher Pay Increase – All teachers in the first five years of their careers with Metro Schools now have a base pay of $40,000. This was one of the cornerstones of the budget proposal and has already generated a lot of excitement among our teachers and our new recruits.

Raise for All Teachers –All teachers will receive a raise of 2% – at minimum – in addition to any step increases they are due.

Support Employee Raise – Support employees will receive a 2% cost of living raise, their first since 2007. This is in addition to step increases.

New Teachers – The district planned to hire 90 additional teachers this year to meet growing enrollment. Those positions remain in the final budget. The district did not reduce any teaching positions.

WHAT WAS REDUCED

Compressing the Top End of Teacher Pay Scale – The earlier budget proposal called for a compression of the teacher salary schedule, so teachers would reach the top level of pay in 15 years. There just wasn’t enough money to make this happen this budget cycle, but we hope to take another look at it for next year.

Some Vacant Positions – The district will not fill some vacant positions and will shift some responsibilities among other employees.

Various Items in Several Departments – Supplies, printing, travel, overtime and other items were reduced to reach the final number. While no one wanted to ‘nickel and dime’ the budget, all reductions were considered, no matter how small.

In the end this is a terrific budget that will have a major impact on our students and employees. Teachers and support staff will earn more. We are in a better position to recruit the best teachers from across the country. And we still have top quality educators in every school.

We are a very fortunate urban school district. While many cities are forced to cut school budgets dramatically, Mayor Dean, the Metro Council and the people of Nashville have provided the funding the district needs to continue our forward momentum. We are a school district on the rise.

See the budget in its entirety on our 2012-13 Budget page.

 See the new teacher, support employee, & administrative salary schedules.

Keeping Metro Schools Cool: A ride-along with air conditioner repair

It’s seven a.m. and trucks are already rolling out onto Murfreesboro Road, headed to schools with air conditioning problems. The storm the previous night knocked out the A/C at twelve schools, and with classrooms nearly ready to receive teachers, there are several other jobs waiting, too.

Richard Hill and his ride.

Richard Hill, who has been working with the Metro Schools HVAC team for 34 years, drives one of those trucks. He knows a lot about heating and air and has seen a lot of change in his department, his schools, and the district. His father was a plumbing foreman for Nashville Public Schools starting in the 1950s – long before “Metro” even came into the picture.

He’s headed to Julia Green Elementary School, where four A/C problems were reported that very morning. Hill has to be versatile. He’s staring at four classrooms with three different problems and three different types of units.

Hill works as part of a team, but is personally responsible for 11 schools. In all there are 14 techs like him, six more dedicated to changing air filters, two mechanics for window units, three coordinators, and two more employees to run the energy management system. That’s 27 people responsible for heating and cooling more than 13 million square feet of occupied space, changing 50,000 air filters every year, and maintaining an average of 100 pieces of HVAC equipment at every campus.

A chain reaction led to a busted fan motor.

Job number one at Julia Green is a large outside unit used for a classroom and a hallway. He opens the panel to reveal a jumble of wires, circuit boards, coils, hoses, and tanks. The problem is clear: a busted bracket led to a busted fan blade and eventually a busted fan motor. It can’t be fixed today; parts have to be ordered and pieces taken apart. With such a complicated machine, when one part breaks, others are likely to follow.

The HVAC shop runs as its own well-oiled machine with dozens of moving parts, and work orders are run through a strict priority system. First, above all else, is Harris-Hillman School. Any big problem for the exceptional education students at Harris-Hillman, many of whom are medically fragile, immediately becomes priority number one. Second are elementary schools, because younger children are much more sensitive to temperature changes. Middle and high schools rank third and fourth, respectively. They also look at the size of the issue to determine priority, with widespread problems coming out ahead of single classroom issues.

You’ll notice the offices at Bransford Avenue are not on the priority list.

Urgent calls pop up, too. Sometimes whole schools lose heat or leaks cause standing water. Those hazards are treated as emergencies, and can throw a wrench into addressing other jobs.

Hill searches for the source of a water leak.

Job number two at Julia Green is a leaky A/C unit inside a classroom. A small puddle of water has collected underneath. Hill lies down on the floor to get a good look at the cause. He can’t get to the problem without removing the whole unit from the wall. Another seemingly simple problem with a complicated solution.

With 180 buildings of varied ages, the HVAC units are widely varied, too. Renovations at Julia Green led to newer units being installed alongside older ones of completely different types. That’s typical of schools across the district. But Hill and the other techs have the know-how fix them all. They work on circulating pumps, spray pumps, cooling towers, boilers, chillers, gas packs, heat pumps, VRT units and VRV units. They replace parts and fix units in closets, in classrooms, in ceilings, in basements, on grass, and on rooftops. They know their stuff.

Job number three is a non-starter. Floor waxing is in progress and Richard doesn’t want to disrupt the work or risk messing it up.

He’s used to that, though, and takes care not to upset normal operation of the school, even stopping to pick up bits of leaves he’s tracked in from outside. He often has to work around class schedules when on the job. Teachers may want the heat or air fixed right away, but they also don’t want loud vacuum pumps to run while they’re trying to teach or groups of kindergarteners distracted by ladders reaching up into the ceiling. That’s why Hill likes closet units – he can work all day long and not interrupt instruction. He always takes instruction into account.

Hill uses his hands and ears to find the problem.

Job number four is a closet unit. He suspects there’s a leaky hose, so he feels around and listens carefully for escaping and harmless nitrogen gas. Touch and hearing are simple enough tools for a man with decades of experience.

For the past 18 months, all school maintenance requests have been made through a computerized system called ‘SchoolDude,’ which automates and streamlines the process. When a work request is made, it’s automatically sent to the relevant repair department, prioritized, and marked ‘In Progress.’ Foremen know exactly what’s going on, who’s working on what, and how many orders each school has made – ever. Request records are not erased. That way, as HVAC foreman Mike Porter puts it, “If we have an on-going issue with one particular classroom, I can do a report and see exactly what’s going on.”

That improved communication with schools helps ease the repair process and ease the nerves of teachers, principals, and parents waiting for a repair.

A reminder of why they do what they do.

No one takes this job lightly. There are stats posted on the wall of the HVAC offices showing air conditioning to be the #1 building condition to affect student achievement. The men of the HVAC crew work hard and work often – there’s even one man each week designated for 24-hour on-call duty. But they can’t control the weather and they can’t stop the requests from coming in.

“During the year, you can say we average 25-30 work orders a day,” Porter says. “When school gets ready to start, when everybody comes back in, when kids start, we’ll average 75-80 work orders a day.

“I really, truly try to do 24-hour service, but sometimes it’s just not possible. It’s just not feasible all the time.”

When it gets hot, systems work harder than normal, and some may not be big enough to handle extreme heat. That can lead to breakdowns or freeze ups. More break downs means more requests, which can mean slower service.

But no one is forgotten. All Mike Porter, Richard Hill, and the rest of the team ask for is patience while they work their way through dozens of tickets.

“People gotta realize some of this equipment is 35 years old,” Porter says. “Harris-Hillman is a perfect example. The chiller that runs that school is 35 years old. It’s set for replacement this year, finally. That capital money we got – it helps. It really does help. To be able to put that money out there, where it needs to be in schools like Harris-Hillman is a huge help. Huge help.”

There are only so many HVAC repairmen to go around, but they do get around and they never lose focus on why they do what they do. As Porter puts it, “The whole reason why we’re here and why any of us has a job is for the students.”

See more photos of HVAC repair work

MNEA supports Metro budget proposal & higher pay for new teachers

Joining a growing list of supporters, the Metropolitan Nashville Education Association has pledged its support of Mayor Karl Dean’s 2013 budget proposal. Writing about the endorsement, MNEA President and middle school teacher Stephen Henry says:

While most of the buzz has centered on the $40,000 starting salary, the new compensation plan actually seeks to compress the total teacher salary schedule by reducing the number of steps, which is a significant modification and a good thing for teachers. Paying teachers well is a good way to attract and retain the best professionals to serve the children of Nashville.

Read the full MNEA letter of support.

Show your support for the budget proposal.