School-based budgeting gives power to the principals

“Knowledge about the needs of students is greatest closest to the student… School leaders require the ability to make decisions based on their knowledge, expertise and professional discretion.”

In a world of principal autonomy and school-based decision making, what is left for the central organization of a modern school district? Where does it fit in, and what role does it have to play?

Here in Nashville, the role of central office is changing dramatically. The top-down management structure is disappearing. In its place is a knowledge and support organization designed to provide central services, study and share innovative practices, develop leaders and keep schools accountable. In fact, this change is already reflected in the district budget and in a pilot program working in 15 schools right now for school-based budgeting.

What is school-based budgeting, and what does that look like?

At these 15 schools, principals have direct control over $6,300 per student (on average), meaning they can spend that money as they see fit. That number is expected to increase over time. The rest of the money goes to central services like transportation, food services, human capital, textbooks, building services and more.

SEE the school’s individual budgets.

The idea is to bring powerful decision-making power right into the schools, where the most knowledge about individual students lives. Next year, this program is expected to expand to 50-60 schools and could go district-wide by 2015-16.

During that time the whole concept could go even further, putting 100% of per-pupil funding on school level budgets. That would greatly expand the level of flexibility and discretion given to each principal and ensure funding is distributed equitably based on individual student need. In that scenario, school leaders would “buy” central services from the district, and there would be certain non-negotiable services like the Board of Education.

This is a culture change, moving central office to a system of specialized support for schools and giving more decision-making power to principals.

Updated: Where does the money go?

UPDATE: Our comprehensive and award-winning budget book is now available for your review. At 228 pages, is contains all the financial facts you could want for fiscal year 2013-14.

DOWNLOAD the FY2013-14 Budget Book
(PDF – 33.8MB)

Contained within the budget book is a greatly expanded version of our original post, the 2012-13 School Year Expenditure Analysis. It gives an in-depth (50 page) look at all of the money spent from the Metro Schools operating budget and grants.

For the sake of convenience, we’ve broken it out into a separate document.

DOWNLOAD the SY2012-13 Budget Analysis
(PDF – 2.1MB)


PREVIOUSLY:

Let’s look at the facts of public education funding in Nashville.

Here is a breakdown of the 2012-13 operating budget:

  • $714 million – 2012-13 District Operating Budget
  • $441 million – Amount sent directly to district-run schools
  • $28.2 million  – Amount sent to charter schools
  • $163.3 – million – Amount spent on school-specific operations and instructional support services like transportation, maintenance, custodial and grounds, IT
  • $41.4 million – Amount spent on Board of Education, Human Capital, Finance and Purchasing, instructional departments and other central support functions
  • $39.2 million – Amount spent on retiree benefits, pension and debt service

When those are added together, they give a great deal more context:

  • Including charter schools, nearly 66% of resources serve schools directly.
  • Including school specific services like transportation and maintenance, more than 88% of MNPS expenditures flow to schools to provide and support instruction.

In chart form:

Directly to District-run Schools $441,107,943 61.7% All school-based staff such as teachers, principals, counselors, librarians, bookkeepers, etc.
Centrally Managed, School-based Services $163,348,961 22.9% Transportation, maintenance, custodial, utilities, textbooks, and itinerant social workers, psychologists, and other
Central Services $41,458,693 5.8% Board, Superintendent, Finance, Purchasing, HR, Leadership & Learning Supervision, other centralized services (e.g., most of IT/data warehouse)
Obligations $39,252,805 5.5% Pension, retiree insurance, debt service
Charter Schools $28,240,250 4.0% Pass-through to charter schools
Other $1,032,606 0.1% Pass-through expenses
GRAND TOTAL $714,441,258 100%

How implementing Common Core State Standards has changed my classroom

by Cicely Woodard, 8th grade math & Honors Algebra I teacher at Rose Park Middle Magnet

Since implementing Common Core State Standards in my middle school mathematics classroom, my role as teacher has changed.  No longer am I the ultimate source of knowledge in the classroom.  Instead I am a facilitator of student-centered, student-led learning.  No longer am I helping students to choose the right answer.  Now I am helping them to develop deep understanding of mathematics that has meaning to their lives.  My expectations are high, and everyday my students are rising to meet those expectations.

The role of my students has changed as well.  In the past, my students were doing math activities just to master concepts.  Now they engage in high level math tasks that require them to think critically about mathematical ideas.  Before my students listened to me explain math concepts and gave some explanations to me.  Now they are participating in deep discussions with their peers in which they must formulate their own understandings, justify their thinking, and critique the reasoning of others.  At one time, my students focused on choosing the right answer on a multiple choice test.  Now they concentrate on learning math that is relevant to their everyday lives and communicating their understanding of that math.

My students are becoming effective communicators and courageous problem solvers who are not afraid to tackle rigorous math tasks.  They have a sincere desire to be successful.  When I see them, I see young people who are one step closer to being ready for life after high school.  They truly are becoming prepared for college and the workforce.  I attribute all of these positive changes to the implementation of Common Core State Standards in my classroom.

Learn more about Common Core State Standards & PARCC Testing: