Statement from Director of Schools Dr. Jesse Register on the Metro Schools Performance Audit

The audit report we received last week is a thorough analysis of our district’s operations. We always appreciate an outside perspective of our system, and we value much of the feedback given in this report.

There is much in this report to consider, much we have already addressed and some we do not agree with. Of the 124 recommendations given to district administration, we agree with the vast majority of them and almost all of them are currently being implemented or have already been addressed.

The report identifies nearly equal amounts of savings that can be generated over the next five years and investments needed to improve services.

The most dramatic changes recommended in this report are to outsource three of our most vital non-academic functions. We have decided not to pursue those recommendations at this time. We have explored the risks and benefits of outsourcing these services in the past, and we determined that it was not worth any potential money to be saved. In fact, it could potentially cost the city more along with an expected degradation in service.

District improvement is an on-going effort, and we must always be thinking and practicing innovatively. We will continue to pore over this extensive report and make sure we consider every recommendation seriously.

Read the fact sheet on the Metro Schools Performance Audit report.

The full Metro School Performance Audit report can be found on the Office of Internal Audit website.

Letters of intent to apply to operate charter schools opening fall of 2016 and 2017

Eighteen letters of intent to file applications for charter school authorization were submitted by Monday afternoon’s deadline. Of the letters, 14 propose expansions of networks currently operating schools in Nashville, and four are proposals from new operators.

Eights of the letters point toward new elementary school (K-4) proposals, with three of those from Rocketship, which already operates one school in Nashville and is preparing to open a second this fall. Three of the first time operators plan to propose elementary schools. Existing operators Intrepid College Prep and KIPP signaled their intention to propose new elementary schools for their networks.

East End Academy, sponsored by the Martha O’Bryan Center, will seek to add grades 6-8 to its existing K-5 charter to complete development of a K-8 school.

Three middle school proposals will come from KIPP, New Vision, and Knowledge Academies. Each organization currently operates middle schools in Nashville.

LEAD Public Schools plans to propose adding high school grades (9-12) to its Cameron College Prep campus along with up to four new conversion schools over the next 1-4 years.

One proposal, from The Dream Academy, seeks a 6-12 grade configuration.

School Name Grade Range Proposed Opening
D.R.E.A.M. Academy PK-4 2016
International Academy of Excellence K-4 2016
Intrepid College Prep Elementary K-4 2017
Jump Start Reading and Math Academic K-4 2016
KIPP Elementary (replication) K-4 2017
Rocketship #3 K-4 2016
Rocketship #4 K-4 2016
Rocketship (conversion) K-4 2016
KIPP Middle (replication) 5-8 2017
Knowledge Academies @ The Crossings 5-8 2016
New Vision – NW 5-8 2016
East End Prep Middle 6-8 2017
LEAD Conversion 1 5-12 2016
LEAD Conversion 2 5-12 2016
LEAD Conversion 3 5-12 2017
LEAD Conversion 4 5-12 2017
The Dream Academy 6-12 2016
Cameron HS 9-12 2016

“This is a very early step in the process,” said Alan Coverstone, who heads the Innovation Office htat manages charter school authorizing for Metro Schools. “We will not know how well prepared the schools are to operate and meet the immediate needs in our district until after their applications are submitted April 1, 2015.”

Efforts to professionalize authorizing and oversight of charter schools since 2009 have borne fruit as the district has granted charters to several schools that are both academically high-performing and serve a diverse student body.

“The MNPS mission emphasizes the importance of high-performing and diverse schools, and we are pleased to see some of our real successes in those areas growing and serving more students well each year,” said Coverstone.

Once actual applications are received on April 1, each will undergo a rigorous and thorough review of organizational and financial capacity, educational plans, accessibility, and need. “We will only recommend approval of strong schools that serve the best interests of the students of Davidson County,” said Coverstone.

In the past year, examination of the potential fiscal impact of charter schools confirmed the district’s previously articulated priorities for schools that improve academic performance by converting management of low-performing schools and for schools located in areas where they can help to alleviate overcrowding from rapid student enrollment growth.

Submission of letters of intent to apply to open charter schools gives the Office of Innovation time to organize and train its application review teams according to the Principles and Standards of high-quality authorizing articulated by the National Association of Charter School Authorizers (NACSA).

The time between now and April 1 also provides opportunity for potential applicants to consider, develop, and adapt plans in order to strengthen their potential applications serve the articulated needs of MNPS students.