Link

Joining Peabody’s Camilla Benbow is Candice McQueen of Lipscomb University. In today’s copy of The Tennessean, Dr. McQueen says:

Unfortunately, some of the toughest teaching challenges in Nashville are also among the lowest-paid. Teachers are already candidates for burnout and turnover based on the work they do, but when they see how their work is valued by our city vis-á-vis other options, it is doubly discouraging. An excellent teacher willing to take on any challenge in Nashville has plenty of higher-paying opportunities in other school systems.

As dean of Lipscomb University’s College of Education, I have been closely following the proposal to raise teachers’ starting salaries in Metro Schools. Many of our graduates want to teach in Metro Nashville schools after graduation, because they see the potential for impacting students’ lives and our community. But in return for their willingness to do this hard and meaningful work that ultimately affects quality of life in our city, they have to accept thousands of dollars less than they can earn in another city.

Read the entire article here.

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Peabody Education Dean supports our plan for raising teacher pay

The Dean of Education at America’s number one school for teachers has given a whole-hearted endorsement of the Metro Schools plan to raise starting teacher pay.

In an open letter to Director of Schools Dr. Jesse Register, Dean Camilla Benbow of Peabody College at Vanderbilt University said she supports Metro Schools increasing the starting pay for teachers. The proposed salary schedule has starting teachers making $40,000, existing teachers receiving raises ranging from 1.9% to 8.2%, and all teachers reaching the top levels of pay in just 15 years rather than 25. This endorsement joins one from the Metro Nashville Education Association (MNEA).

You can read the full letter below, or click the link at the bottom of this post to see the letter itself.

If you’d like to join Dean Benbow in supporting the starting teacher pay increase, you can show your support by writing or calling the Metro Council and by coming to Council’s meeting on Tuesday, June 5.

Dear Dr. Register,

I am writing you in support of the MNPS effort to increase the starting salary of Nashville Public School teachers.

While teachers unions, policy-makers and the public can find much to disagree on when it comes to how to pay teachers, there’s little disagreement when it comes to the simple matter of a threshold, starting salary. A higher starting salary attracts more candidates and allows a district to be more selective in its hiring practices. This translates to more effective teachers for Nashville’s students. As you know, Peabody College prepares teachers drawn from a national pool of applicants. These students enter Vanderbilt with SAT scores far higher than what is typical  among schools of education nationwide. Based on their potential, it is certainly in Nashville’s interest to encourage these prospective teachers to remain here to begin their teaching careers. But at less than $35,000, the current MNPS starting salary for a beginning teacher with a bachelor’s degree is lower than the national average (approximately $37,500 in 2009-10 dollars), and well below the starting salaries in many of the urban areas from which our students come. We would love for more of our students to stay in Nashville and contribute to education in our community.

Polling data that Vanderbilt collected last fall suggest that the public would also be supportive of high starting salaries. Of 1,423 Tennesseans polled, 71 percent said that public school teachers in Tennessee were underpaid. Respondents ranked education as the No. 2 priority for state government. Perhaps now is the opportune time to initiate a salary increase.

Finally, I would add that not only would a higher starting salary help with teacher recruitment, it is also likely to help with retention. With nearly half of teachers leaving the profession in the first five years, a high starting salary, or increases in salary for early career teachers, may incentivize some to stay. Similarly, shortening the amount of time required for teachers to reach the top of the salary scale will enable MNPS to retain more of its experienced teacher workforce.

In short, we support MNPS’s proposal to increase teacher salaries. A favorable outcome is in the interest of Nashville’s children.

Sincerely,

Camilla Benbow
Patricia and Rodes Dean of Education and Human Development

See the Letter of Support from Peabody Dean Camilla Benbow

Wear blue for Metro Schools!

Wear blue for Metro Schools on Tuesday, June 5!

We want to send a clear message to the city and the Metro Council: we support Metro Schools and want the district to continue its improvements.

Wear blue on Tuesday to work, to the store, walking around the neighborhood, and most importantly to the council meeting that night.

Wear blue to spread the message throughout the city that we want more for our students, teachers, and schools.

Wear blue as the Council votes for the second time on the Mayor’s budget and property tax proposals.

Wear blue and send us a picture of your support so we can show everyone how strongly our community feels about furthering the great work being done in Metro Schools.

Wear blue!

Send your pictures to MNPSCommunicationsOffice@mnps.org. Post them to Facebook and tag us. Share them on Twitter and mention us.

And remember to attend that night’s Council Meeting and show your support in person!

Invitation: Wear blue to show the Metro Council how much you support our schools

More pay for all teachers. A new school to ease overcrowding. Preventing dropouts before students even reach high school. Maintaining everyday services to 81,000 students and 10,000 employees.

An enormous amount of thought and effort went into preparing every single line this year’s Operating Budget proposal. It is a carefully crafted plan for continuing the successes already seen in the last three years:

  • more graduates
  • fewer dropouts
  • higher standards
  • greater achievement
  • classes more rigorous than ever before

To vote against fully funding our schools is to slow the forward momentum created under the reforms of MNPS Achieves.

So how can we ensure receiving our full budget request of $720 million?

You are the answer.

We’ve already asked you to contact Council Members to urge support of the Mayor’s budget and property tax proposals. Now we’re asking you to come show your support in person.

Tuesday, June 5, the Council will discuss these proposals and vote on them, the second of three required votes. We want Metro Schools supporters there in force to show Council Members how much we care about our students, our schools, and the future of public education in Nashville.

We’ll all be wearing blue to show our support. All are welcome to join.

WHEN: Tuesday, June 5, 6:30pm
(Come early to be sure you can find parking and arrive before the meeting starts.)

WHERE: Council Chamber, Metro Courthouse

WHO: Everyone who cares about public education. Please wear blue as a visual symbol of your support.

Mayor Dean, Dr. Register show us why Southeast Davidson County schools need capital improvements

Director of Schools Dr. Jesse Register took Mayor Karl Dean and other city and district officials on a tour of a few of the schools in Southeast Davidson County that would receive much needed renovations and expansions under the $100 million capital improvement plan for MNPS.
Capital Improvements Map
The first stop was Oliver Middle School, just eight years old but already 100 students over capacity and in need of more classrooms. The plan for Oliver is to add 12 classrooms to replace its seven portables currently housing sixth grade classes, art, chorus, and Encore.

The story was the same at nearby A.Z. Kelley Elementary: built in 2006, Kelley is 100 students over capacity and in need of ten new classrooms. Parents present at the tour told reporters they support the Mayor’s plan to for a property tax adjustment in order to pay for expansions at this school and others. The Cane Ridge and Antioch areas are among the fastest growing in the county, and schools need to expand along with the population.

While at A.Z. Kelley, Mayor Dean and Dr. Register joined students for lunch in the cafeteria.

The tour then took them to Antioch Middle School. Antioch is in dire need of improvements and renovations. The HVAC, lighting, electrical, and plumbing systems all need major upgrades. Many of the windows are original to the building – from 1948 – and are drafty and crumbling at the edges. The school also needs new flooring in many areas, a new roof, adjustments to ceiling height, and a litany of other repairs and upgrades.

The last stop was Norman Binkley Elementary, where teachers have named a section of the campus “Portable City” because of the 11 portables that house the entire fourth grade class, art and music. The main building at Norman Binkley is also in need of repairs, including replacing the original steam radiators used for heat.

These four schools are among the ten schools that would receive significant capital investment under the Mayor’s budget proposal. The plan also includes money to purchase land for new elementary and middle schools in Southeast Nashville.

How are capital projects chosen and prioritized?

In order to see this plan pass, the Metro Council must pass the budget and an adjustment to the county’s property tax. To voice your opinion on this issue, contact your Council Member.

Below is a detailed list and cost of the projects planned for these four schools. 


Henry Oliver Middle School
($3.6 million) 

6211 Nolensville Road, Nashville
Original Construction: 2004 (expansion needed due to growth in zone)
Enrollment: 804  Capacity: 707
Grades Served: 5-8

  • This project includes new construction for an additional 12 classrooms and minor revisions to the existing building at the location of the addition.
  • Oliver Middle has seven portables, which house sixth-grade classrooms, Arts classes, the Chorus program, and the high-academic program called Encore.

A.Z. Kelley Elementary School
($2.65 million) 

5834 Pettus Road, Antioch
Original Construction: 2006 (expansion needed due to growth in zone)
Enrollment: 561  Capacity: 665
Grades Served: PK-4

  • This project includes new construction for an additional 10 classrooms and minor revisions to the existing building at the location of the addition.
  • A.Z. Kelley Elementary has four portables. In past years, it has had as many as 10, and due to growth in zone, will likely need additional portables next year.

Antioch Middle School
($11 million) 

5050 Blue Hole Road, Antioch
Oldest remaining construction: 1948; additions 1950, 1954, 1955, 1956, 1959, 1963, 1969, 1972; renovation 1999
Enrollment: 461
Grades Served: 5-8

  • Antioch Middle has six portables.
  • Renovation of Antioch Middle would include
    • new finishes – paint, ceilings, floorings
    • major upgrade to HVAC and improvements to electrical, lighting and plumbing systems
    • replace exterior windows
    • new entry vestibule at main entrance
    • revised kitchen area
    • revised administrative area
    • repair or replace roof
    • modify drive to separate car and bus traffic
    • comply with ADA, current building codes and LEED

Norman Binkley Elementary School
($6.5 million)

4700 West Longdale Drive, Nashville
Original Construction: 1960; additions 1961, 1963; 2007
Enrollment: 475  Capacity: 356
Grades Served: PK-4

  • Norman Binkley Elementary currently has 11 portables, which house the fourth grade class, Art, and Music
  • Renovation to Norman Binkley Elementary would include:
    • New construction to provide for improved art, music, library, and kitchen spaces
    • New construction to provide for improved administrative spaces
    • New finishes, paint, ceilings, flooring
    • Major upgrade to HVAC (replace original steam radiators) and improvements to electrical, lighting and plumbing systems.
    • Replace exterior windows
    • New entry vestibule at main entrance
    • Site lighting upgrades.
    • Comply with ADA (repair or replace chair lift), current building codes and LEED.